Let City Council hear your support for the Bus Lane

Content-tab Public statements from other supporters

  • Matt Horner says,

    Councillors and city staff,

    I am writing to show my support for Hamilton's bus lane.

    Although not without its flaws, the bus lane is a step forward for the city which has lagged behind fulfilling many of its own goals related to public transit. The single lane carries as many passengers as the remaining car lanes do combined. Travel time is shortened and reliability is increased for riders. Instead of killing the lane, councillors should vote to extend it.

    Its flaws are not difficult to overcome either. Much of the congestion (which really doesn't seem like much, to be honest) seems due to buses trying to cross lanes to get to the MacNab terminal, something that can be easily fixed with signal priority for buses. This easy fix can help both transit riders and drivers alike.

    Although the bus lane may not be in your own ward it still has a positive impact on your constitutes. The b-line is the most heavily traveled route in the city and strengthening it and making it faster and more reliable can help with connectivity to other wards.

    I want to thank those councillors and staff members who have supported the bus lane and I want to implore those who may be on the fence or who are opposed to re-think their position and lend their support for the bus lane and help make the city a better, more accessible, and healthier city to live in.

    It's truly an exciting time to be living in Hamilton and I hope city council can make the right choice to help lead the city to a more prosperous future.

  • Cora Muis says,

    I believe that GOOD transit and bike lanes improve life for those who cannot afford a car and also those who choose not to own a car. Thus indirectly improve it for all. I live 6 k or more from a bus stop, so likely will never use city transit while I live here. However, transit needs to be done well for it to get used!

  • Biljana Vasilevska says,

    I live east of downtown, own a home, and am car-free by choice, not because I cannot afford a car. I take HSR, bike and walk whenever I can. I support all infrastructure that reduces reliance on privately-owned cars, and I support the bus lane, while acknowledging that the pilot project has identified areas for improvement.

  • Melissa Crawford supports this.
  • Cindy Smith supports this.
  • Dawn Vanson says,

    Due to disability, I usually drive where I need to go espcially since my workplace has no bus route anywhere near it. That means however, since we are a one car family, that leaves my family members using transit or biking. Public transit and bike lanes enable us to remain a one car family - please support the bus lanes - it's the only way we can improve public transit!

  • Mark Sinke supports this.
  • David Low says,

    We've been to so many wonderful European cities that have great transit and walkability. Light rail is featured in many places and we have always impressed by the convenience and affordability. Let's not miss the "bus" or "train" on this one in Hamilton!

  • Mark Ilton says,

    We need to be thinking about how to improve the bus lane, not on how to eliminate it!

  • Jocelyn Weatherbe says,

    Transit only works well if the actual riders are taken into account not just traffic flow. Transit will become more popular the better it gets and the better it gets the better Hamilton gets for all residents.

  • Richard Russell says,

    I am a regular user of the HSR along the route 5 corridor and value the added speed and visibility the designated lane gives to buses. Please use the rest of the Metrolinx money to improve rather than destroy this project.

  • Steve Dykstra says,

    Many lower city neighbourhoods face significantly higher rates of poverty than their suburban counterparts. While I am able to afford a vehicle and bus tickets, this is not the case for many of my neighbours and friends.

    It is important for me to live in a city where those experiencing poverty have access to as strong of a public transit system as this city can afford.

    Hamilton's ambition is to become the "best city to raise a child." This transit lane, in making life a bit easier for those who rely on the bus, takes one small step towards achieving that aim.

    My reading of the most recent city staff report is that the bus lane is achieving its goals, creating quicker service for those going through town.

    I believe that with the modifications suggested by the report and championed by Mayor Eisenberger, the lane can continue to be effective for transit users while minimizing disruption for vehicles.

    I support a city where non-vehicle transit becomes an increasingly significant portion of this city. It's my understanding based on the series of Transportation reports released over the past 10 years that this is the direction the City plans to go.

    A move against the bus lane is a move against the strategic direction identified by the city in its own planning documents.

  • Clinton Williams says,

    I think informing traffic about options to avoid King St. as a throughway to the 403 is needed, there are many other options, Barton, Cannon, Wilson, Hunter, Charlton. Cars need to learn to adapt to the changing road environment instead of staying entrenched in the idea that King St. is a mini-highway to the 403. King St. is the most pedestrian freindly main street in the entire city, slowing traffic and making it easy to catch and ride the bus through the core is essential. Main St. is the opposite, it's not freindly to anything but vehicular traffic, but that's another issue.

  • Martin Peters says,

    Please stop accommodating those who selfishly wish to shave mere minutes from their commutes; these individuals do not care about Hamilton and its future. However, as councillors, you must care. It is your responsibilty. You should realize that it is not too much to ask a constituent of yours to wait at an odd red light if it means a better Hamilton.

    Also, councillors, please visit other cities. Experience them. Study them. Learn from them. You will not find a successful city that does not invest and commit to public transit infrastructure. It is truthfully embarrassing that Hamilton, a major city, has been so overwhelmed be a single bus lane.

    You chose to accept a position that significantly affects our city's planning. Please challenge yourselves to make decisions that place the city's success ahead of all else.

  • Renee Wetselaar supports this.
  • Krista Fleury says,

    The fact that it's people who don't use public transit (it's the same with the bike lanes)are the complainers should be obvious: people who selfishly want to drive through our neighbourhoods at speeds normally used on major highways; where friendlieness becomes agressive driving (note the statistics on pedestrian fatalities & injuries in this small city).
    And yes, I attended the meetings regarding making the city more pedestrian friendly; and yes, I have a driver's license {drivers often assume that cyclists/walkers don't}; and yes, when I'm on my bicycle I obey the real laws; and no, when I'm walking I dont...Why? When I moved to Hamilton (from Toronto) I learned to jay-walk for my own protection...people here don't realize that it's a dangerous place for pedestrians, much more dangerous than Toronto, due to the fact that it's so easy to drive around here much too fast.
    People who are part of the solution, & not the problem, should not be punished by close-minded, selfish individuals without any community involvement. Pedestrians are not necessarily poverty-sticken losers who can't afford a car; but often environmentally, socially aware people who give a damn about things.

    Krista Fleury

  • Krista Fleury says,

    The fact that it's people who don't use public transit (it's the same with the bike lanes)are the complainers should be obvious: people who selfishly want to drive through our neighbourhoods at speeds normally used on major highways; where friendlieness becomes agressive driving (note the statistics on pedestrian fatalities & injuries in this small city).
    And yes, I attended the meetings regarding making the city more pedestrian friendly; and yes, I have a driver's license {drivers often assume that cyclists/walkers don't}; and yes, when I'm on my bicycle I obey the real laws; and no, when I'm walking I dont...Why? When I moved to Hamilton (from Toronto) I learned to jay-walk for my own protection...people here don't realize that it's a dangerous place for pedestrians, much more dangerous than Toronto, due to the fact that it's so easy to drive around here much too fast.
    People who are part of the solution, & not the problem, should not be punished by close-minded, selfish individuals without any community involvement. Pedestrians are not necessarily poverty-sticken losers who can't afford a car; but often environmentally, socially aware people who give a damn about things.

    Krista Fleury

  • Erinn Turnbull says,

    I truly hope Hamilton council supports corrective actions for the bus lane to turn it into the success that everyone sharing the road deserves, rather than cancel it prematurely to only the detriment of our transit riders who deserve better transit service.

    Thanks very much :)
    Erinn Turnbull
    Ward1

  • Hugh MacLeod says,

    Moving the bus lane out by a car width would allow for parking and improved comfort for pedestrians. Sensible modification should be used instead of the fail destroy model. Eventually replace the bus lane with a train please.

  • Paul Weinberg says,

    I support the maintenance and extension of the King St bus lane as well as a new LRT.

  • Maria Topalovic says,

    My primary mode of transport is by car and I support keeping the bus lane.

    A vote to keep the bus lane is a vote toward a more liveable city. Let's improve the lane and have it continue to be part of the improvement to transit that Hamilton needs. We have to keep moving forward and making our streets more complete, efficient, safe, and liveable for ALL users.

    A vote to keep the bus lane is an encouraging vote for anyone who has ever taken public transit in Hamilton. I urge you if you haven't used the HSR before, take a trip so you can start to understand what users experience. And remember, if you typically drive a car (as I do), you should be thanking everyone taking the HSR, riding their bike, or walking - they are actually making your trip more convenient for you. Let's make theirs more convenient too.

  • william oates supports this.
  • Josie Di Nello supports this.
  • David Carson says,

    Transit is more sustainable than cars and a better way to use scarce road space. Hamilton is way behind other GTA municipalities in transit growth - have to believe it is execution not demand.

  • Justin Sharp says,

    Stop car-centric counseling.

  • Les Szamosvari says,

    Now that I have read the foreword of the petition and learned of the pilot project research, I wonder why these were not mentioned by the councillors or in the Spec, for instance. Did I miss any published conclusions and findings.
    Anyway, this petition and the newly created movement are needed. Thanks.

  • Ken Oakleaf says,

    I do not own a car, I have never owned a car and I have no current interest in owning a car. I am currently 31yo and take the bus to work every day. Eliminating the bus lane would jam busses in traffic going into and out of a major trasit hub causing disruption throughout the schedule preventing HRS from offering a reasonably reliable service. As for cars, no matter how many lanes are available for car traffic there will never be enough. Rush hour will ALWAYS cause congestion regarless of how many lanes you feed to the beast.

    Can drivers present clear evidence that an extra lane will provide relief enough to compensate for the the disruption it will cause, not only current routes, but HRS's CAPABILITY to provide reliable service through the downtown core?

    I will leave off with this TED talk on how public transportation represents democracy in action: http://www.ted.com/talks/enrique_penalosa_why_buses_represent_democracy_in_action?language=en

  • Graeme Douglas supports this.
  • Justin Hall supports this.
  • Graham McNally says,

    It is time that the city start building for the future instead of reacting as we grow. The future is now and we need to start building the city we want!

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